Herniated Disc Disability

Herniated disc disability can be the result of a very severe traumatic accident which may leave permanent painful symptoms in an affected patient. However, this type of event is incredibly rare.

Most herniated discs do not cause any pain at all, and even those symptomatic disc injuries caused by trauma will generally resolve in 6 to 8 weeks, with or without treatment.

This article will examine how disability may result from a herniated disc, through both purely physical and contributory psychological processes.

Furthermore, patients will be advised how to prevent themselves from suffering disability from any significant back or neck pain syndrome.

Physical Herniated Disc Disability

Herniated Disc Disability

Some unfortunate patients do suffer from lasting neurological effects from a particularly bad disc injury. Typically, these people have suffered spinal cord or cauda equina damage due to a violent herniation which compressed the affected neurological tissue.

This type of lingering injury is usually the result of a severe car accident, act of violence or sports injury occurrence. All but the worst herniations should resolve with time and proper care and permanent spinal cord or spinal nerve injury is very, very rare.

However, if you are among the few who have endured such a violent herniation leading to nerve damage, my heart truly goes out to you. There may be little modern medicine can offer in terms of a cure for your pain, but at least there are a wide range of potentially effective symptomatic treatments available.

Perceived Herniated Disc Disability

The overwhelming majority of people who consider themselves to be disabled from a herniated disc are really just victims of the considerable nocebo effect of a particularly grim diagnosis, combined with a collection of conditioned responses tied to psychosomatic symptoms.

Patients who have been warned that their spines are unstable, or in a progressive state of degeneration, are likely to suffer an emotionally induced escalation of symptoms.

Remember that most herniated discs are blamed for symptoms when all along the pain is sourced from a completely different causation. In these cases, the herniation is a mere scapegoat blamed for pain, but coincidental to the symptomatic expression.

The physical effects of the disc might be suspect, but the psychological aftermath of the diagnosis is well documented. Many people diagnosed with a herniated disc or 2 will endure a downward spiral of pain and dysfunction leading to eventual disability.

The crime of it all is that there is absolutely no structural reason for the disability to exist. It is truly a result of programming and nocebo effect.

Herniated Disc Disability Advice

I have seen many disabled patients respond incredibly well to knowledge therapy. This does not surprise me, since I am one of these very patients. I was on a steady course towards functional limitation and had been warned by many doctors that surgery and eventual disability were likely to be my fate.

It is no wonder that my pain grew worse every year and treatments did little or nothing to provide any lasting relief.

Once I found knowledge therapy, I regained the confidence in my body and empowered my mind to cure the pain. I succeeded in overcoming my tormenting back pain in a matter of weeks and have devoted myself to helping others ever since.

You have the power to break the bonds of disability. All it might take is a fresh perspective on your condition created by learning the real facts about herniated discs.

In my case, the pain returned, but I feel much better about my future now. My mindset has improved and with it, my body has responded favorably, despite new challenges in the form of ever-present symptoms.

Patients with nerve or spinal cord damage enacted by extreme injuries might have few options which might help them overcome disability. Some might just have to learn to cope with the limitations imposed on them, but many can still live well and without terrible pain.

To learn more about your symptomatic care choices, consult with your neurologist or pain management specialist.


Herniated Disc Disability to Herniated Disc
5/5/09 Revised 8/11/13


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